Yes, it does matter. The flower-tops and leaves of some industrial hemp strains may be a viable source of CBD (legal issues notwithstanding), but hemp is by no means an optimal source of cannabidiol. Industrial hemp typically contains far less cannabidiol than CBD-rich cannabis. Huge amounts of industrial hemp are required to extract a small amount of CBD, thereby raising the risk of toxic contaminants because hemp is a “bio-accumulator” that draws heavy metals from the soil.
Some scientists believe that hemp oil containing all the cannabinoids and other compounds extracted from the plant is more therapeutically beneficial than isolated cannabinoids. The “entourage effect,” introduced in 1998 by renowned cannabinoid researchers Raphael Mechoulam and Shimon Ben-Shabat, maintains that isolated or synthetic cannabinoids aren’t as effective for eliciting curative effects as when all of the plant’s natural constituents work together synergistically.

In fact, the majority of them report that CBD actually seems to work phenomenally well with the caffeine – they claim that it reduces cases of the “jitters” (which makes sense considering that CBD is a well-known anti-spasmodic), and also that it works wonders in terms of elevating mood, increasing mental acuity, and promoting general productivity.

Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.

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