Here’s what we do know: The cannabis plant contains a wide variety of chemical compounds, many of which fall under the broad category of cannabinoids. There are more than 100 — exactly how many, we’re not sure. The best-known and certainly most profitable are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Both of these compounds stimulate the same receptor in the brain, called CB1, but have differing effects on the brain. Researchers aren’t totally sure why.
It may have something to do with the fact that THC stimulates that CB1 receptor a lot, in turn triggering the psychoactive effects of marijuana like disturbed sensory perception, impaired motor skills, and anxiety. Conversely, CBD stimulates CB1 very lightly, causing some effects that seem downright opposed to those of THC including relief from anxiety, stress, and hyper-excitability.
The few CBD studies out there give us limited information, and hardly any about recreational CBD use. One study gave people different amounts of ingested CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg), as well as, for comparison, a placebo and Klonopin; those people then had to give a public speech, an action associated with high levels of anxiety in the broad populace. Neither 100 mg nor 900 mg, nor the placebo, had any effect. The 300 mg dose, though, did have a measurable calming effect on heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. (The Klonopin also worked.)
Let’s take a good look at the claim, which is based upon the underlying premise that hemp acts as phyto-remediator. Well, yes, it does. All cannabis serves exceptionally well for phyto-remedation purposes. This means that cannabis mops up contamination and can be used to clean up all manner of nastiness. It also means that if it’s grown under less-than-pristine conditions, it carries that nastiness with it when it’s harvested. And, it carries that nastiness with it into products made with it. So, clean sourcing is an especially big deal with ALL cannabis.

Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of reasons to recommend CBD (short for cannabidiol) in general, and I can’t even imagine my life without coffee. But is this combination a realistic go-to for caffeine consumption, or, as High Times says, a weird wellness trend that should be nipped in the bud? I decided to find out, but quickly realized that—like many things involving cannabis and science—the answer depends on who you ask.

I have read that taking CBD oil may help in the reduction of the size of tumors (specifically brain tumors). I’ve been taking Hemp oil instead, as that’s what came up when I did a search for CBD oil on a popular website. (My first bottle was not flavored and tasted absolutely horrible. Next one was mint-flavored and tastes far better.) Wanted to know if Hemp oild would give me similar results as CBD.
As CBD’s medicinal qualities continue to make waves across the country, more states are starting to look into limited medical marijuana legalization laws so their residents can get access to CBD products to treat their debilitating medical conditions. If a patient is unlucky enough to live in a state with no laws in place or no legal access to CBD products, he or she may feel as if there’s no viable alternative that can provide the same relief.
My dad has severe advanced stage Dementia. Will CBD oil help him at this point? He is now refusing to eat any solid food, but will accept most drinks.In addition, he has lost a great deal of weight even though they're giving him Mega Shakes containing a full meals worth of proteins, etc. He gets at least 4 of these a day..some which he refuses. Is his Dementia too far gone for CBD oils to help him?

“If you use a tiny amount of psilocybin, it still does something,” says Blessing. “Microdosing with psilocybin still has effects biologically, but there isn’t any evidence that low doses of CBD, like 5 mg, do anything at all.” The only study I could find indicating that low doses of CBD have an effect concluded that a rare form of childhood epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is treatable using 10 mg of CBD. For anxiety in adults? Nothing.
In the current market space is there much difference in cost, in bulk, between 99+% pure CBD from the different sources being discussed? IOW between high-cbd cannabis, and low-total-cannabinoid “industrial hemp”, and hemp grown for seeds not fiber? Extraction from high-cbd cannabis would seem easier as you have to work with less plant material per unit of end product, but then it costs a lot less per lb plant material to grow a huge field of hemp. So, how does it land these days? 

Hemp CBD Oil

×