The past year has seen a surge of interest in marijuana’s CBD, a non-intoxicating cannabis compound with significant therapeutic properties. Numerous commercial start-ups and internet retailers have jumped on the CBD bandwagon, touting CBD derived from industrial hemp as the next big thing, a miracle oil that can shrink tumors, quell seizures, and ease chronic pain — without making people feel “stoned.” But along with a growing awareness of cannabidiol as a potential health aid, there has been a proliferation of misconceptions about CBD.
To put it simply, I have a kaput back, discs are not in a healthy state in the lumbar area and the inflammation can get so bad you would think it’s hot enough to cook an egg. Vaping this CDB fluid drops the inflammation rapidly, and that obviously helps with the pain. My missus was born with bad knees which are full of arthritis. I got her vaping as well, and she felt a reduction in pain as well. There are analgesic effects too, as well as “relaxing” effects which knock out the need to take Valium to stop muscle cramps. All in all, I went from up to 6 different pills per day to, well, effectively zero, apart from the days when the pain goes seriously high.
Using an oil tincture, Jamroz devised a crude, homemade CBD coffee concoction back in 2012 in order to find daily pain relief from a couple of slipped discs that he suffered during a snowboarding mishap. While the brew was relatively effective in terms of pain management, he claimed that the original cup tasted something like “hot, grassy swamp water.”
It’s not about quality, either; even the finest CBD-infused coffee won’t change the mind of substance purists like myself. Let’s say you’re drinking CBD coffee to relax—hey, that’s great… but that caffeine isn’t going anywhere. In fact, the only feasible situation CBD coffee would work would be if the coffee in question was decaffeinated… but we all know that only dads drink decaf. CBD coffee is the culmination of two great things Frankenstein’d together to make one mediocre product, like Julian Lennon or those shoes that look like socks.
CBD oil derived from whole-plant marijuana has seen promising results for numerous medical treatments, including treating children with epilepsy. (In 2013, CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta introduced the world to a child who after using CBD oil went from having 300 seizures a month to only two.) On April 19, the AP reported that an FDA panel is reviewing a a pharmaceutical-grade CBD oil made from whole-plant marijuana called Epidiolex, a possible treatment for rare forms of pediatric epilepsy. If approved, it would be the first marijuana-made medication sold on the U.S. market. A day later, on the marijuana community’s “high holiday,” April 20, New York Senator Chuck Schumer introduced legislation to decriminalize marijuana on the federal level. Forecasters are predicting that legal cannabis in the U.S. will be outselling soda by 2030.

Gwyneth Paltrow’s obsessively followed lifestyle site Goop, never one to miss a chance to gush about a wellness trend, recently published a guide to CBD cocktails. One of the many cushy lounges offering swag at Coachella next month is promising CBD oils, along with yoga and vegan food, for all its guests. A writer for the website the Cut wrote that a little CBD made her feel “delightful.”


But, uh, what is it that CBD is supposed to do? I visited a cannabis dispensary in Boulder to find out what the hype was all about. After passing an ID check, I was introduced to a “budtender” who pointed me to an impressive array of CBD products — tinctures, skin patches, drink powders, candies, salves, massage oil, lotions, “sexy time personal intimacy oil” and even vaginal suppositories to treat menstrual cramps.

Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.
@mikethehousehusband representing #flowerpowercoffeeco dropping coffee with @blackbirdcoffeesd thank you for your #hospitality #cbdcoffee#Coffeetime#Coffeeaddict #Coffeeshop#cbccoffeelover #ButFirstCoffee#CoffeeIsLife #Coffeebreak #Barista #Coffeebean #BaristaLife#Coffeeoftheday #Cafe #Socialdraft#Cuppuccino #CaffeineAddict#Mocha#Frappuccino #CoffeeShots#ILoveCoffee #Instacoffee
@mikethehousehusband representing #flowerpowercoffeeco dropping coffee with @blackbirdcoffeesd thank you for your #hospitality #cbdcoffee#Coffeetime#Coffeeaddict #Coffeeshop#cbccoffeelover #ButFirstCoffee#CoffeeIsLife #Coffeebreak #Barista #Coffeebean #BaristaLife#Coffeeoftheday #Cafe #Socialdraft#Cuppuccino #CaffeineAddict#Mocha#Frappuccino #CoffeeShots#ILoveCoffee #Instacoffee
The final advantage in the above list of a lower cost per milligram is one worth looking into further. As previously mentioned, because a full spectrum product is derived from a whole plant ex-tract it typically costs more (you the consumer are getting more than just CBD). Chase Terwilliger, CEO of CBDistillery, adds, "It is less expensive to manufacture isolate-based products com-pared to full-spectrum products. Rather than taking advantage of a larger margin, we decided to pass the savings along to the consumers." For those looking for a pure CBD product, you will al-so be delighted to find that CBD oil made from isolate is typically less expensive than a full-spectrum product. Which brings up a final point which is to do your research on the industry standard pricing for cost per milligram to ensure you are not paying an unnecessary premium.

CBD Coffee

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