This article has many errors. “Hemp” means cannabis grown for fibre, but it also means cannabis grown for seed. So while it is true that fibre hemp “looks similar to bamboo,” hemp grown for seed has big buds and looks just like “marijuana.” Seed hemp is grown in a similar manner to marijuana, with plants more spaced out. These plants produce much more resin, at comparable levels to any other outdoor-grown cannabis. If these “hemp” strains for seed production were grown exactly the same as they are now, but they were not fertilized by male plants, they would be an excellent source of resin for CBD and also other cannabinoids. Even when they do go to seed, they still produce plentiful resin with a good level of cannabinoids.
First, let’s look at the differences between the plants that make CBD oil.  To start with, the two plants look physically different.  This is due to the different reasons that both of them are grown.  Cannabis, grown for its flowering buds for reasons of smoking or THC extraction, are generally short and wide.  Hemp, on the other hand, is tall and narrow as it is not grown for its buds. Hemp is low in THC and is often grown for a variety of purposes including the manufacture of materials.

Hudson Hemp began growing industrial hemp through a New York state pilot program that began in late 2017. Industrial hemp is extremely low in or entirely free of THC and is grown for fiber, hempseed oil, and, increasingly, CBD. Hudson Hemp grows Cherry Wine, one of several varieties, or strains, of the cannabis plant that have been bred to remove THC (which remains illegal in New York) and maximize CBD yield. Some strains are naturally high in CBD and very low in THC; others are high in THC and low in CBD; still others have similar levels of each.
Laboratory evidence indicated that cannabidiol may reduce THC clearance, increasing plasma concentrations which may raise THC availability to receptors and enhance its effect in a dose-dependent manner.[28][29] In vitro, cannabidiol inhibited receptors affecting the activity of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels, which may affect neural activity.[30] A small clinical trial reported that CBD partially inhibited the CYP2C-catalyzed hydroxylation of THC to 11-OH-THC.[31]
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This popular Divisadero cafe is known as one of the few spots in the Bay Area where you can try Kava, a Pacific island root made into tea. The drink has a similar effect as CBD — it makes you chill without making you feel like you’re floating above your body — so it’s no surprise to find CBD drinks on the menu. You can opt for nitro CBD coffee or a CBD elixir (expect rotating flavors like ginger lime) on tap and enjoy feeling all Zen under the funky lighting. They also offer both the CBD drink and the coffee in growlers to go if you’d prefer to melt into your couch solo with pizza and Netflix.
We have seen a huge amount of children with epilepsy that has benefited enormous from getting high CBD rich cannabis as treatment. Many children like Charlotte Figi, who was having 300 grand mal seizures a week and Jayden and his dad Jason, who also decided to try cannabis with high CBD as a treatment option. There are loads of people reporting about huge benefits from using CBD/THC for treating epileptic seizures. And many share their stories on channels like Youtube and Facebook for everybody to learn from their experiences and now many studies have been done and are being done on this as well.

As it turns out, CBD (short for cannabidiol) is a phenomenal natural therapy for literally dozens and dozens of different ailments. General pain relief is probably the single most common reason that people take CBD, but it’s also proven to be extremely effective for psychological conditions like anxiety and depression, as well as for things like chronic seizures/epilepsy, diabetes, migraines, neurodegenerative disease (multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia), digestive issues, and even menstrual cramps.


It is a strict violation of the Food and Drug Administration DSHEA guidelines to make medical claims about the efficacy of CBD products in the treatment of any medical condition or symptom. Although preliminary research has shown tremendous promise of CBD oil helping people in pretty remarkable ways, legitimate CBD companies will refrain from making any direct medical claims. Be very wary of companies that defy this guideline, because if they disregard this particular rule, what other rules are they willing to ignore?
Mike, what kind of breast cancer (invasive ductal, I presume)? How many of her lymph nodes were positive? How big was the primary tumor? Reason I ask is that in women with Stage I or IIA tumors that are estrogen-and progesterone-receptor-positive and HER2-negative (ER+/PR+/HER2-) with three or fewer positive lymph nodes, there is a genomic assay test on a sample of the tumor, called OncotypeDX, that will tell doctors whether chemo is necessary or would even work at all. Medicare covers that test 100%.That type of breast cancer mentioned above, which I had as Stage IA, is treated in postmenopausal women with anti-estrogen drugs called aromatase inhibitors(aka AIs: anastrazole, letrozole, or exemestane)which have as a side effect joint pain. CBD oil is effective for this joint pain it is not, I repeat, NOT a substitute for chemo, radiation or these anti-estrogen drugs.So don’t assume your mom’s cancer will require chemo; but if it does, CBD helps with those side effects as well. If she lives in a state where medical marijuana is legal, there are doctors who sub-specialize in certifying applications for a medical marijuana card, and in the interim before the card is issued can advise as to the appropriate dose of CBD oil (legal and over-the-counter in all 50 states). Some (though not most) medical oncologists will certify their own patients’ medical marijuana card applications so she need not seek out another doctor; and will advise the appropriate dose for her symptoms. Once she gets her card, the “budtenders” in the licensed dispensaries can advise her as to the right CBD product (with or without THC), strength, and dosage. If she lives in a state where recreational weed is legal, the “budtenders” in the marijuana shops can steer her to the right strength of CBD oil and the right dosage.
In short, Cannabidiol – or CBD – is a cannabis compound that has many therapeutic benefits. Usually extracted from the leaves and flowers of hemp plants – though marijuana can also be a source – CBD oil is then incorporated into an array of marketable products. These products vary from the most common, like sublingual oils and topical lotions, to the less common (think CBD lattes). Basically, if you can dream it, you can buy it. 

Non-GMO CBD Oil

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