Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of reasons to recommend CBD (short for cannabidiol) in general, and I can’t even imagine my life without coffee. But is this combination a realistic go-to for caffeine consumption, or, as High Times says, a weird wellness trend that should be nipped in the bud? I decided to find out, but quickly realized that—like many things involving cannabis and science—the answer depends on who you ask.


In terms of what’s actually legal, CBD operates in a gray area. Many Bay Area bars like Flore and Bottelón in the Castro started to offer alcoholic CBD drinks earlier this year until the laws got a little iffy this summer. Now you’re technically not allowed to put cannabis-based CBD oils and extracts into anything alcoholic due to slight traces of THC, but CBD derived from hemp is THC-free and thus OK for cocktails. At least that’s how establishments are operating for now.
Scientifically, industrial Hemp and Marijuana are the same plants, with a genus and species name of Cannabis Sativa. They have a drastically different genetic profile though. Industrial Hemp is always a strain of Cannabis sativa, while marijuana can be Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, or Cannabis ruderalis. The major difference is how industrial hemp has been bred compared to a marijuana form of Cannabis sativa. Typically speaking, industrial hemp is very fibrous, with long strong stalks, and barely has any flowering buds, while a marijuana strain of Cannabis sativa will be smaller, bushier, and full of flowering buds. However, newer industrial hemp varieties in the USA are being bred to have more flowers and higher yields of cannabinoids and terpenes, such as our Colorado hemp we’re now using!
According to a growing body of research, CBD may play a role in the growth of new brain cells, a process known as neurogenesis. CBD is also widely recognized as having anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory abilities, which make CBD a promising therapy for a wide range of conditions, from neurological disorders to autoimmune diseases to chronic pain and depression.
The final advantage in the above list of a lower cost per milligram is one worth looking into further. As previously mentioned, because a full spectrum product is derived from a whole plant ex-tract it typically costs more (you the consumer are getting more than just CBD). Chase Terwilliger, CEO of CBDistillery, adds, "It is less expensive to manufacture isolate-based products com-pared to full-spectrum products. Rather than taking advantage of a larger margin, we decided to pass the savings along to the consumers." For those looking for a pure CBD product, you will al-so be delighted to find that CBD oil made from isolate is typically less expensive than a full-spectrum product. Which brings up a final point which is to do your research on the industry standard pricing for cost per milligram to ensure you are not paying an unnecessary premium.

CBD Coffee

×