Laboratory evidence indicated that cannabidiol may reduce THC clearance, increasing plasma concentrations which may raise THC availability to receptors and enhance its effect in a dose-dependent manner.[28][29] In vitro, cannabidiol inhibited receptors affecting the activity of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels, which may affect neural activity.[30] A small clinical trial reported that CBD partially inhibited the CYP2C-catalyzed hydroxylation of THC to 11-OH-THC.[31]
Most CBD oils are available in round-number concentrations such as 250mg, 500mg, and 1,000mg. While these strengths accommodate many CBD users, they may not be sufficient for those with preferences that fall outside round numbers. NuLeaf Naturals offers a less conventional selection of concentrations: 240mg, 725mg, 1,450mg, 2,425mg, and 4,850mg. This range ensures that most users will find a strength that works for them.
This may seem like a repeat of an earlier question, but while that question related to concentration of CBD in the product, this is simply a question of how much you’re getting in total. Most bottles are labeled in a similar way – “1,000mg CBD Oil” or “1,000mg Hemp Extract” – which generally means the entire bottle contains a total of 1,000mg of CBD.
CBD oil derived from whole-plant marijuana has seen promising results for numerous medical treatments, including treating children with epilepsy. (In 2013, CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta introduced the world to a child who after using CBD oil went from having 300 seizures a month to only two.) On April 19, the AP reported that an FDA panel is reviewing a a pharmaceutical-grade CBD oil made from whole-plant marijuana called Epidiolex, a possible treatment for rare forms of pediatric epilepsy. If approved, it would be the first marijuana-made medication sold on the U.S. market. A day later, on the marijuana community’s “high holiday,” April 20, New York Senator Chuck Schumer introduced legislation to decriminalize marijuana on the federal level. Forecasters are predicting that legal cannabis in the U.S. will be outselling soda by 2030.

This may be a good place to point out that not all CBD products are created equal. The industry is still largely unregulated, and the quality and quantity of CBD in a given product will vary wildly. Third party testing definitely helps to monitor companies’ claims, but it’s still up to you as the consumer to do your homework on the best CBD products.


"A CBD company may create a CBD oil, test it, and use the test results to create their label," Bonn-Miller says. "The problem is if they never test their product again, or they test it once a year, you have no idea whether each batch is the same as the first one that they used to create the label. The vast majority of companies are not using manufacturing standards that assure product consistency over time. Companies should be testing every batch they make and tossing batches that don't fall within the specs of their label."


If the CBD is not water soluble, then does it float to the top or sink to the bottom of a cup of coffee? Is the blender just to scramble the oil into a million little droplets or what? Won’t they all come back together to form larger droplets and eventually bind back into an oil slick if you don’t down the cup fairly quickly? Will it bind with a powdered creamer? How can you get it to dilute in a cup of coffee? Oil and water don’t mix, so whats the deal? Sounds to me like you’re likely to get it all at once be it at the beginning or the end of the cup….
As it turns out, CBD (short for cannabidiol) is a phenomenal natural therapy for literally dozens and dozens of different ailments. General pain relief is probably the single most common reason that people take CBD, but it’s also proven to be extremely effective for psychological conditions like anxiety and depression, as well as for things like chronic seizures/epilepsy, diabetes, migraines, neurodegenerative disease (multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia), digestive issues, and even menstrual cramps.
In the current market space is there much difference in cost, in bulk, between 99+% pure CBD from the different sources being discussed? IOW between high-cbd cannabis, and low-total-cannabinoid “industrial hemp”, and hemp grown for seeds not fiber? Extraction from high-cbd cannabis would seem easier as you have to work with less plant material per unit of end product, but then it costs a lot less per lb plant material to grow a huge field of hemp. So, how does it land these days?

Hemp CBD Oil

×